• Don’t make the food with your bare hands.
  • Stop making people’s food with your hands.
  • Quit preparing all the food with your bare hands.
  • I don’t know why you insist on making food with your hands but you should stop doing that.
  • The health inspector will cease operations of the restaurant if you keep making onion volcanoes and other entrees with your bare hands.
  • Even if you wear gloves on the inspection day, how are we going to take down the large sign in front of the building that says, “The Only Hand-Made Teppanyaki In Town!”
  • I think our sales would be better if you stopped making food with your bare hands.
  • Posting signage around the restaurant that says, “We Pinky Promise We Washed Our Hands Before Returning To Work,” is not comforting for families watching you make their meal with your bare hands.
  • Toilet paper in the restroom is one-ply.
  • You’re failing to realize that people go to hibachi restaurants to watch the chef cook with utensils and perform elaborate tricks with them. Here, they’re surprised to discover you carefully pinching each ingredient to flip it so you don’t burn yourself.
  • When you burn yourself on the grill, don’t blow on and suck your burnt fingers.
  • When you’re trying to chop up ingredients and you do a karate chop massage method over top of the ingredients, it does not have the same effect as a knife.
  • Customers have made comments about your singed and band-aid riddled fingers touching everything.
  • The tricks you’ve incorporated might be more impressive if you were doing them with utensils. For instance, everyone wants to see a chef flip, catch, and balance an egg on a spatula but a guy tossing and catching an egg in his hands and then pretending to find the egg behind someone’s ear is far less impressive.
  • I found a gun in the host stand.
  • At Benihana, they flip discarded shrimp tails into their coat pockets with a spatula. When you place shrimp tails into your coat pocket with your hand, people don’t clap or film it because there’s no skill involved.
  • One of the hosts is bringing a gun to work every day
  • You lack an understanding of the term “handmade.” Handmade doesn’t mean your hands are the only tool making something, it implies that a machine didn’t do all the work. With cooking, the handmade element is implied. Also, you’re making the meal in front of them. How does eliminating sanitary food handling add authenticity to the experience?
  • I think how you make the food has overshadowed the host that keeps bringing his gun to work.
  • I’m sorry you burnt your hands badly enough to hospitalize yourself but we all really hope you’ve learned your lesson this time.
  • While you were in the hospital, we fired the host who kept bringing his gun into work and right before leaving he yelled, “Tuesday, February 8th 9:00 AM!” I suggest we close that day.
  • We’re happy to see you back from the hospital but just because there’s no feeling left in your hands doesn’t mean you should resume cooking with them with the same gusto as before.
  • Your hands having no feeling left isn’t an open invitation to show off how long you can hold your hands against the grill. It’s another sign of a growing problem we’ve been trying to address for months.
  • The host we fired is sitting outside in his car.
  • People are saying they smell burnt skin all throughout the restaurant.
  • The ex-host has been looking through the windows staring at people all day.
  • While you’ve driven our whole customer base away, the skin-burning act has attracted a new customer base of unsettling, shifty characters. By the looks of how full this suggestion box is, I can’t be the only one who feels this way.
  • My suggestion is that everyone stops talking about my gun if they know what’s good for them.
  • Between the threat of the gunman and the unorthodox food preparation, we’re staging a mass walkout. But most of us could deal with that the way we have for months if it weren’t for the single-ply toilet paper in the restrooms.

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